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221 – August, 09 – This Day in Baptist History Past

Gano and Washington

He immersed George Washington

John Gano departed this life at his home near Frankfort, Kentucky, on August 9, 1804. He had sustained injuries from a fall from his horse, but after suffering from a paralytic stroke, had recovered enough to be a part of the “Great Revival”, and preached a masterly discourse on the deity of Christ in defense of the truth against Arianism in 1803. Gano had a long and varied ministry. He had pastored churches in Philadelphia and N.Y. City, served as one of the Regents of N.Y. University, as a Revolutionary War chaplain and a wilderness preacher. Being an ardent patriot, he threw in his lot with the colonists and served as chaplain to General Clinton’s N.Y. Brigade. He was under fire at White Plains and displayed a cool and quiet courage which commanded the admiration of both men and officers at Chatterlou’s Hill when he found himself in the forefront of the fight. He served with distinction at Ft. Clinton and in the Western Campaign of 1779 against the Indians. Although there is no documented evidence, three of Gano’s children testified that at the close of the war their father had baptized George Washington in the Hudson River. Washington is quoted as saying, “I have been investigating the scripture, and I believe immersion  to be the baptism taught in the Word of God, and I demand it at your hands. I do not wish any parade made or the army called out, but simply a quiet demonstration of the ordinance.” Daniel Gano, one of Gano’s sons and a captain of the artillery, was present and said that he, with about forty officers and men, accompanied the chaplain down to the Hudson River where the Rev. John Gano baptized Washington.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 327-28.

He immersed George Washington

John Gano departed this life at his home near Frankfort, Kentucky, on August 9, 1804. He had sustained injuries from a fall from his horse, but after suffering from a paralytic stroke, had recovered enough to be a part of the “Great Revival”, and preached a masterly discourse on the deity of Christ in defense of the truth against Arianism in 1803. Gano had a long and varied ministry. He had pastored churches in Philadelphia and N.Y. City, served as one of the Regents of N.Y. University, as a Revolutionary War chaplain and a wilderness preacher. Being an ardent patriot, he threw in his lot with the colonists and served as chaplain to General Clinton’s N.Y. Brigade. He was under fire at White Plains and displayed a cool and quiet courage which commanded the admiration of both men and officers at Chatterlou’s Hill when he found himself in the forefront of the fight. He served with distinction at Ft. Clinton and in the Western Campaign of 1779 against the Indians. Although there is no documented evidence, three of Gano’s children testified that at the close of the war their father had baptized George Washington in the Hudson River. Washington is quoted as saying, “I have been investigating the scripture, and I believe immersion  to be the baptism taught in the Word of God, and I demand it at your hands. I do not wish any parade made or the army called out, but simply a quiet demonstration of the ordinance.” Daniel Gano, one of Gano’s sons and a captain of the artillery, was present and said that he, with about forty officers and men, accompanied the chaplain down to the Hudson River where the Rev. John Gano baptized Washington.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 327-28.

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